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Learning disabilities dating agency

Ask one volunteer to (1) say what the other word is and (2) explain the association they have found between the two words.

Similarly, activity 3.4 (‘Find a festival’ –factual interaction) uses a topic (‘festivals’), rather than a picture, to generate questions and responses.

They range from relatively simple, short activities to much longer tasks which will need an hour or more to complete.

An example of the former is a sentence-completion activity (‘Don’t you hate / love it when ….? As an example of the latter, there is a complex problem-solving information-gap where students have to work out the solution to a mystery (activity 6.13), an activity which reminds me of some of the material in Jill Hadfield’s much-loved is not an easy book to use, in the sense that it is hard to navigate.

The index at the back of the book helps to some extent, but a clearer tabulation of activities by interaction type, level, time required, topic and language focus (if any) would be very welcome.

Teachers will need to devise their own system of referencing so that they can easily find activities they want to try out.

The final chapter (chapter 8: ‘Task design’) provides an excellent summary of the possibilities of communicative online interaction, and more experienced teachers may want to read this chapter first.

Chapter 7 provides a useful, but necessarily fairly brief, overview of considerations regarding feedback and assessment Overall, is a very rich resource, and one that will be best mined in multiple visits.

Lindsay Clandfield and Jill Hadfield’s new book is intended to promote online interaction between and among learners and the instructor, rather than between learners and software.